“I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark” By Debbie Levy

“Fight for the things that you care about. But do it in a way that will lead others to join you.”            – –  Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. This true story shares the path that Ruth took to make her mark on our judicial system. This masterful book about an influential Supreme Court Justice will help your students understand why disagreeing can change the world…one disagreement at a time. The illustrations and use of BOLD PRINT alert the reader to text features and the power of print. This is a must read book that is not limited to any age or reading level.

Debbie Levy is a former lawyer and newspaper editor residing in Maryland.  She has won numerous awards for both her fiction and nonfiction books for young people.

About the Author

Debbie Levy is a former lawyer and newspaper editor residing in Maryland. She has won numerous awards for both her fiction and nonfiction books for young people. Check out her work by visiting her website at debbielevybooks.com. Illustrator Elizabeth Baddeley lives in Missouri, but her illustrations reach far and wide. She holds an MFA from the school of Visual Arts in New York and has contributed to other outstanding biographies including A Woman in the House (and Senate) and Women Who Broke The Rules: Mary Todd Lincoln among others.

 

Tips for I Dissent

  • Begin with a discussion of what dissent means, especially in court cases. Utilize text vocabulary.
  • This book is rich in history and exposing prejudice. “Boys were expected to grow up, go out in the world, and do big things. Girls? Girls were expected to find husbands.” Imagine using that quote for discussion or a writing prompt with your class.
  • Utilize the debate centers in connection with this text. Discuss how disagreeing (or “to dissent’) can be done in a constructive way and lead to learning more about a topic.
  • Discuss the quote found on the back cover. What does this mean? How is this connected to debating?

Additional Resources

  • A detailed biography of Ruth Bader Ginsburg can be found at the end of the book.
  • Assign students to write about something they wish would be changed and why it is important to them.
  • Practice an age appropriate “classroom case”. More art time? Less math time for a day? Ask students to form teams and debate using evidence. Encourage and support their persistence!
  • Have students listen to a Supreme Court Case argued by Ruth Bader Ginsburg by following instructions on the last page of the book.

Buy this book!

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