Visiting the Counseling Center: What to expect

Mary Grigar, PhD (Assistant Director/Training Coordinator of the Counseling Center)

In recent years, there has been increasing focus and attention on the prevention of and response to sexual violence. However, some may still feel silenced when they attempt to reach out. At Roosevelt University, we want all our students to feel heard. One place to get help is the Counseling Center, where I work as part of a team of psychologists and therapists.

I’d like to tell you a bit about what survivors of sexual violence might experience, and what kind of help we can provide in the Counseling Center. It is important for all who have experienced trauma in their life to feel a sense of support when sharing their experiences. Talking with a professional therapist is one step in the healing process and can be very powerful in overcoming trauma. You can share your story with us without judgment or blame.

Counseling Center

If you have experienced sexual violence, you may go through a range of physical and emotional symptoms. Some common reactions to a traumatic experience include: muscle tension, pain, injury, shortness of breath, fatigue, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety, shock/numbness, shame, guilt, feeling a loss of control, embarrassment, fear, grief, depression, loss of trust, loss of a sense of safety, irritability, suicidal thoughts, crying or the inability to cry.

A therapist’s job is to help you make sense of what happened to you. Sometimes survivors doubt what happened because the person who hurt them was someone they trusted. Sometimes they may not know what happened at all because they were intoxicated or drugged during the experience. Some may have experienced trauma at a young age and are just now putting the pieces together. Therapy becomes a safe place to talk about how these experiences have shaped you.

Our goal as therapists is to be there for you through the process of remembering and provide you with the skills to cope with the past in order to regain a sense of control over your life. Trauma reshapes your life in so many ways. We can help make sense of its influence and help to reorganize your life to be in a healthy space again.

A therapist’s job is to help you make sense of what happened to you. Sometimes survivors doubt what happened because the person who hurt them was someone they trusted.

The first step in seeking help through the Counseling Center is to schedule an appointment. In this appointment, which could last from 60 to 90 minutes, an intake clinician will ask a range of questions to figure out how to get you the most useful help. This person will ask questions about your medical and emotional history and your relationships and family. You don’t have to talk about anything you’d rather not; we’re simply gathering information to make recommendations for you. We might refer you to medical, legal or advocacy resources, as well as therapy services in the Counseling Center or the community. If you enter therapy in the Counseling Center, you will remain with the same therapist throughout your subsequent sessions. We offer short-term individual, couples and group therapy for students (only one partner needs to be a student for couples therapy).

Counseling Center

It’s important to know that at the Counseling Center, we can—and will—keep your information completely private and confidential. Any University employee who is told of sexual misconduct has the obligation to protect your privacy, but he or she also must report the incident to our Title IX Coordinator. In the Counseling Center, we are not obligated to report to anyone. (One exception: We cannot guarantee confidentiality if a student is a potential danger to himself or herself or others. We must ensure that all individuals are safe so that we may begin the healing process.)

We know it takes a lot of trust to allow us into your world, and it is our duty to make you feel safe, validated and heard. We fully accept the responsibility and consider it a gift to help students.
If you or someone you know needs help overcoming trauma of any kind, reach out to us. You don’t have to feel alone. We are here for you!

The Counseling Center
Chicago: Auditorium Building, Room 470
Schaumburg: Room 114
(312) 341-3548

On campus

To report sexual misconduct, contact the Title IX coordinator, Dr. Bridget Collier.
Wabash Building, 1312
bcollier@roosevelt.edu
(312) 341-2322

Campus Safety, available 24 hours a day
Chicago Campus: (312) 341-2020
Schaumburg Campus: (847) 619-8989

Off campus

Police
Chicago police: (312) 745-4290 or 911
Schaumburg police: (847) 882-3586 or 911

Nearby hospitals
>Chicago
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
251 East Huron St.
(312) 926-2000

Rush University Medical Center
1653 W. Congress Parkway
(888) 352-7874

University of Illinois Hospital
1740 W Taylor St.
(312) 996-7296
>Schaumburg

Alexian Brothers Medical Center
800 Biesterfield Road in Elk Grove Village
(847) 437-5500

Medical and emotional resources

Planned Parenthood—Loop Health Center
18 S. Michigan Ave., sixth floor, Chicago
(312) 592-6700

Rape Victim Advocates
180 N. Michigan Ave., #600, Chicago
(312) 443-9603

Porchlight Counseling Services (for sexual assault survivors)
1740 Ridge Ave., Suite L14, Evanston
(773) 750-7077

Center on Halsted (LGBTQ)
3656 N. Halsted St., Chicago
(773) 472-6469

Hotlines

Chicago Rape Crisis Hotline—(888) 293-2080

Chicago Domestic Violence Line—(877) 863-6338

State of Illinois AIDS/HIV and STD Hotline—(800) 243-2437

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network—(800) 656-4673

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline—(800) 273-8255

Comments

  1. juliafarnandas says

    Yes, i agree your post and good info of If you have experienced sexual violence, you may go through a range of physical and emotional symptoms. Some common reactions to a traumatic experience include: muscle tension, pain, injury, shortness of breath, fatigue, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety, shock/numbness, shame, guilt, feeling a loss of control, embarrassment, fear, grief, depression, loss of trust, loss of a sense of safety, irritability, suicidal thoughts, crying or the inability to cry.Reviewlr

Leave a Reply to juliafarnandas Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *