Remain Labour!

Huuuuuge thanks to my dear friend Kim Dewdney for connecting us with the Labour Party of Tooting (South London) who took us into their war offices at the height of the General Election! We met their staff, and learned
-how they use polling data to target their digital and canvassing message (some of the aggregated info we got to see was strictly top secret! – no photos allowed!)
-how they decide when to visit each ward,
-how they know who thier most likely voters are
-who they most likely won’t waste time trying to convince
-where they feel most vulnerable and to whom

Then we hit the streets of Tooting seeing how they contact voters! We learned that canvassing is hard work, and, in such a short election, is not about changing minds, but simply getting out the vote. Like the Dems in the US, Labour voters tend to get suppressed a bit more readily than Tory voters. So, reminding folks about postal voting, helping them get to the polls if they need that help, and reminding them why it is important!

For many of us, it was our first taste of a real residential area – and since Tooting seems destined to gentrify now that Fodor’s has decided it’s one of the coolest places on earth -we felt very lucky to spend some time among its residents.

 

About Bethany Barratt

Dr. Barratt earned her PhD from the University of California in 2002, and her BA in Political Science/History from Duke University in 1994. She is Director of the Joseph Loundy Human Rights Project, which joins forces with community partners in Chicago and cities abroad to draw and apply comparative lessons to make measurable gains in respect for human rights in urban settings. Professor Barratt has conducted archival and field research in Yellowstone National Park, Central Asia, the UK, Canada, and Australia. She is author or editor of several books including “Human Rights and Foreign Aid” (Routledge, 2007), "The Politics of Harry Potter" (Palgrave McMillan, 2012), and coeditor o "Public Opinion and War: Lessons from Iraq" (Potomac, 2012). She has also authored articles on environmental politics and justice, conservation policy, human rights, foreign aid, US, British, Canadian, and Australian foreign policy, and counterterrorism, in Political Research Quarterly, The Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, and edited volumes from Ashgate and Lexington Books. Besides her teaching experience at Roosevelt and the University of California, she has also taught in a number of jails and prisons. She is an officer or member of several scholarly associations including the American Political Science Association and the International Studies Association.
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